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4.1 Terminology

attribute
HTML attribute, ie: `align=center' - align is the attribute.
author
The author of an HTML document.
block-level element
An element which has a line break before and after (e.g. 'H1' in HTML).
canvas
The part of the UA's drawing surface onto which documents are rendered.
child element
A subelement in SGML terminology.
contextual selector
A selector that matches elements based on their position in the document structure. A contextual selector consists of several simple selectors. E.g., the contextual selector 'H1.initial B' consists of two simple selectors, 'H1.initial' and 'B'.
CSS
Cascading Style Sheets.
declaration
A property (e.g. 'font-size') and a corresponding value (e.g. '12pt').
designer
The designer of a style sheet.
document
HTML document.
element
HTML element.
element type
A generic identifier in SGML terminology.
fictional tag sequence
A tool for describing the behavior of pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements.
font size
The size for which a font is designed. Typically, the size of a font is approximately equal to the distance from the bottom of the lowest letter with a descender to the top of the tallest letter with an ascender and (optionally) with a diacritical mark.
HTML extension
Markup introduced by UA vendors, most often to support certain visual effects. The FONT, CENTER and BLINK elements are examples of HTML extensions, as is the BGCOLOR attribute. One of the goals of CSS is to provide an alternative to HTML extensions.
inline element
An element which does not have a line break before and after (e.g. 'STRONG' in HTML)
intrinsic dimensions
The width and height as defined by the element itself, not imposed by the surroundings. In this specification it is assumed that all replaced elements -- and only replaced elements -- come with intrinsic dimensions.
parent element
The containing element in SGML terminology.
pseudo-element
Pseudo-elements are used in CSS selectors to address typographical items (e.g. the first line of an element) rather than structural elements.
pseudo-class
Pseudo-classes are used in CSS selectors to allow information external to the HTML source (e.g. the fact that an anchor has been visited or not) to classify elements.
property
A stylistic parameter that can be influenced through CSS.
reader
The person for whom the document is rendered.
replaced element
An element that the CSS formatter only knows the intrinsic dimensions of. In HTML, IMG, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT and OBJECT elements can be examples of replaced elements. E.g., the content of the IMG element is often replaced by the image that the SRC attribute points to. CSS1 does not define how the intrinsic dimensions are found.
rule
A declaration (e.g. 'font-family: helvetica') and its selector (e.g. 'H1').
selector
A string that identifies what elements the corresponding rule applies to. A selector can either be a simple selector (e.g. 'H1') or a contextual selector (e.g. 'H1 B') which consists of several simple selectors.
SGML
Standard Generalized Markup Language, of which HTML is an application.
simple selector
A selector that matches elements based on the element type and/or attributes, and not the element's position in the document structure. E.g., 'H1.initial' is a simple selector.
style sheet
A collection of rules.
UA
User Agent, often a web browser or web client.
user
Synonymous with reader.
weight
The priority of a rule.


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